Category Archives: Education

Climate Change Non-Issue for Business Schools

NASA 16-008 – January 20, 2016 – 2015 Global Temperatures . Picture courtesy of NASA Scientific Visualization Studio.

Despite the fact that climate change has enormous economic consequences, only a handful of US business schools which allow students to focus their studies on sustainability.

Recent closures of facilities owned by Nestle and Coca-Cola, as well as an imminent coffee shortages on the horizon, which will disrupt companies like Starbucks, has still not sent the message to business schools that climate change is an issue that needs addressing by the business community.

Climate change affects every resource used by business: agriculture, water, land, energy, and workers and the economy. No business will be immune from the transformation caused by climate change. Some observers believe that without radical change in our business models climate change will lead to disastrous consequences.

The scientific consensus is that the best way to avoid disaster is to keep the average global temperature increase to only 2 degrees Celsius. In order to reach this goal emissions of greenhouse gases need to be limited to 1 trillion metric tons which will mean a 49 to 72 percent reduction globally from 2010 levels.

Clearly business needs to take a leading role in the reduction of gases that contribute to climate change, but the schools that are educating our future entrepreneurs and business leaders are not taking the issue seriously enough.

One study looked at 51 schools out of the hundreds in the country. It found that when a sustainable business course is offered, it is usually just an elective. Just a few business schools offer minors, majors, certificates or graduate degrees in sustainability business and /or management.

The 51 schools that were chosen for the study are leaders in the study of sustainability. The vast majority of schools do not offer any kind of coursework on the subject. The study showed that even the best schools for sustainability are doing a bad job preparing students for the future that is coming.

College Costs Continue to Climb

Brown University Robinson Hall 2009 Providence Rhode Island. Photo by chensiyuan.

Getting a college education is not getting cheaper: far from it. As the tuition and living expenses rise so does the student debt: collectively, Americans owe over $1.3 trillion in student loans.

With help from the College Board’s Trends in College Price and the Chronicle of Higher Education, the following is a list of some of the country’s most expensive undergraduate educations.

  • Surprisingly, the most expensive school in the country is in Claremont, California. Harvey Mudd College will set a student back $69,717 just for one year of learning. The breakdown is $52,666 is the tuition plus fees, while room and board will come to $17,051 for the year.
  • Number 25 on the list of 50 schools is Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Tuition is $50,910 for the year with an additional $14,976 for tuition. Grand total: $65,886.
    The last on the list of 50 is still not cheap, by any stretch of the imagination. Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island is a bargain (not!) with tuition and fees adding up to $51,366 and room and board adding an additional $13,200.
  • Not everyone needs to go to such expensive colleges. There are choices with lower tuition, such as Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. With over 30,000 students it is the largest school with the least tuition: $5,300 for the school year 2016-17.
  • If you are inclined towards a small college in a rural area, Blue Mountain College is in Blue Mountain, Mississippi. With a campus size of 190 acres and only 457 undergrads, it might be a good choice, especially with tuition running only at $10,534 for the academic year 2016-17.

Three Women of Many from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University

It’s no surprise to the people at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University that their alumni are making it in the news and in political discourse around the world. Maxwell is one of the 12 schools and colleges of Syracuse University and is home to interdisciplinary teaching and research in the social sciences, public policy, public administration and international relations. They have undergraduate programs, master’s programs and PhD programs. Here, we feature three such alumni and the work that they are doing.

Emily Newman, with a MPA from Maxwell, was recently named to City and State magazine’s “40 Under 40 Rising Stars” for the work that she is doing as first deputy commissioner in the NYC Department of Citywide Administrative Services. This is an award given to individuals who work in NYC government, advocacy, media and related areas of expertise.
Sonya Reines-Djivanides, who works in Brussels, Belgium, received a Master of Arts in International Relations from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. Today, she is the executive director of the European Peacebuilding Liaison Office (EPLO). This is an independent platform of NGOs and think tanks that work to prevent violent conflicts. Prior to this, she was the chair of the EPLO’s steering committee and the director of the Brussels Headquarters of Search for Common Ground.
Another woman, Sheridan Marfil, graduated from the Maxwell School with a Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations. She is now the director of digital outreach at Subject Matter. This is a public relations and communications company based out of Washington D.C. They have a particular focus in public affairs and they pair legislative and policy expertise with their advertising, digital, content and media abilities. She manages the digital strategies and conducts the digital outreach efforts.
These are three of the hundreds of examples of Maxwell alumni who are making great strides in the world of public policy, public administration and beyond.

Business Schools Could Lose Overseas Students in President Trump America

Until the election of Donald Trump to become the US president beginning in early 2017, US business schools were a desirable option for students from overseas looking to earn an MBA. Now some of these prospective students are reconsidering US business schools as an option.

“I want to be able to work in the country where I study after graduation,” one marketing executive from India said. “So it is important to be in a place that is immigrant-friendly.”

US business school deans are hopeful that this prospective student is not the sign of a trend.

Douglas Skinner, dean of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business says he is “cautiously optimistic,” about the backlash from a Trump presidency. He pointed out that even if the economy was to stall, (something he does not think will happen,) domestic demand for MBA places would rise, since that is the trend when jobs are more scarce.

But Skinner is afraid that the threatened proposals to immigration will seriously effect enrollment in his school’s MBA program. More than one-third of the full-time students attending the Chicago Booth School of Business come from overseas.

“If there was a restriction on visas to students that would clearly be somewhat harmful to us,” Prof Skinner says. He adds that other schools are even more dependent on students from abroad than Booth is.

New Ranking for US Business Schools’ MBA Programs

The Financial Times has released their assessment of the best MBA programs in the United States for 2016, the second time they have released such a survey.

Coming out on top for the second straight year is Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business for its MBA programs for entrepreneurship.

In second place is Babson College’s FW Olin Graduate School of Business. In the show position, the Darden School of Business of the University of Virginia.

In the fourth through seventh positions were:

  • Dartmouth’s Tuck school
  • Anderson of UCLA
  • UC Berkeley’s Haas
  • The Wharton School of Business

The schools’ rank was decided using several criteria, including the percentage of a school’s MBA’s went on to launch companies, and how many of those new businesses sere still around by the end of 2015.