Category Archives: Economy

Business Spotlight: Ashton Kouzbari & Evolution Spine

When you need medical attention because you have an issue with your spine, you want the very best care. And you want the best equipment used by your surgeon and doctors. This is where Evolution Spine and Munear Ashton Kouzbari step in.

As a healthcare entrepreneur and consultant, Ashton Kouzbari has been in the business for many years. He values being a team player, working with a great team to achieve goals. Kouzbari is currently the President of Evolution Spine, a company based in Dallas, Texas which supplies premier implants to spine surgeons and hospitals. They pride themselves on their flawless service and continuous desire to innovate. They are currently engaged in the design, manufacturing and sales of these medical implants, instruments and biologic materials. The products are used to treat orthopedic and neurological surgical procedures for conditions like generative spine disease, spine trauma and correcting spinal deformities.

Ashton Kouzbari comes to this role with an extensive educational background. He graduated with both a Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences and a Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance along with Minors in Mathematics & Chemistry from Southern Methodist University. He is currently enrolled in the Harvard Business School President’s Program and is actively involved in the Dallas chapter of YPO. YPO includes more than 27,000 chief executives in over 130 countries and the local chapter allows Munear Ashton Kouzbari the chance to work with other career-driven and like-minded business professionals and executives and to share ideas for the future.

Economic Growth Passes Previous Record for Duration

The economy broke a record at the end of June when it surpassed the previous longest period of growth of 120 months, or ten uninterrupted years.


The previous record was set when the US economy didn’t stop growing from March 1991 until March 2001 during which time the average annual real GDP grew by 3.6%. The record-breaking growth we are in now began in June 2009, and is still expanding, although the average annual real GDP has only been 2.3%.


The previous expansion that ended in March 2001 came to its unhappy end when the dot-com bubble burst.


Compared to other expansions, which were far shorter, growth was faster. For instance, during the 45-month expansion from October 1949 until July 1953, the economy grew by 6.9%. Between April 1958 and April 1960, the economy expanded by 5.5%.


Studies have shown that the expansion has not benefited all Americans equally. Steven Pressman of Colorado State University, a professor of economics who is concerned with income inequality, says that 60% of economic gains have benefited the top one percent of the population.


One example Pressman cites are the salaries of schoolteachers. Adjust for inflation, their incomes declined in 2018, by about 0.3%. During the same time period the median pay for top CEOs in the US, including non-salary compensation, climbed by 65%, adjusted for inflation between 2009 and 2018.

Jobless Rate Lowest in Almost 50 Years

The United States has not seen a lower jobless rate than what it is experiencing now since December 1969, according to the US Department of Labor. The rate fell in April from 3.8% in March down to 3.6%.


There is a caveat, the drastic reduction was fueled to a great extent by the number of people who left the labor force in April; almost half a million.


US Labor Department data showed that the economy added an above-expected 236,000 jobs to the market. In addition, average earnings rose by a yearly rate of 3.2%.


Experts said that the numbers show that the economy is still doing well, but not so well that the US Federal Reserve might consider changing interest rates.


The job gains were in the following sectors:


• Construction: Increased by 33,000 jobs
• Healthcare: Increased by 27,000 jobs
• Social assistance: Increased by 26,000
• Financial activities: Increased by 12,000

The number that did not change by much is how many people are working part-time who would prefer to work full-time, but there hours were reduced, or they could not find full-time employment. That number stayed at 4.7 million people.

Companies Backtracking on Trump Love

Trade is a big issue today as it was throughout history.

The joy experienced by global and US business after US President Donald Trump’s 2017 corporate tax break has turned into fear due to his isolationist trade policies, at least according to Fidelity International analysts.


The new study shows that “almost half of all analysts globally say Trump’s policies will be a drag on their sector.” Compare this sentiment to just last year when the same Fidelity analysts reported broad optimism about US leadership and policies.


This year Fidelity says that “most significant is the shift among analysts covering North American companies, whose watchful optimism has entirely evaporated.”


Fidelity’s research is based on 16,000 interviews with chief executives and chief financial officers conducted by Fidelity International, the non-US affiliate of Fidelity Investments. Each year they ask 165 analysts what companies in the sector they cover are expecting for the up and coming year.


Most significant was the doubt Fidelity’s analysts had about Trump’s trade policies. Forty-five percent said the policies would be a burden on business, up from thirteen percent last year. Seventy percent of its China analysts predict that companies’ return on investment will go down in 2019. Only twenty-nine percent thought the same last year.


Global chief of research for fixed income for Fidelity said that “as expected, the impact of trade wars is a key issue amongst our analysts, which has brought a lot of uncertainty into the system.”

David Michery and Clean Transportation

Clean transportation provides a solution to the challenges of air pollution and unhealthy vehicular emissions. It’s a cause that many car companies are making a priority. David Michery, CEO of Mullen Technologies, a company that manufactures and distributes eco-friendly cars, is a leader in the field of clean transportation.

“The congestion and pollution we have been experiencing have been issues across the globe, it is not our problem only,” says David Michery.  “We have therefore prioritized studying innovation overseas in order to develop high quality and efficient solutions.” Cutting-edge, holistic solutions to the clean air crisis include manufacturing electric vehicles that use state of the art battery and energy technologies.

Although many consumers feel strongly about clean transportation, they find themselves bound by their budgets: many electric vehicles cost an upwards of 100,000 dollars. Electric vehicles tend to be luxury cars; driving an electric car is often viewed as a status symbol, reserved for the wealthy.

David Michery recognizes this reality and is pioneering a novel concept: affordable, clean transportation. “We are uniquely focusing on clean tech at an affordable price,” says Michery. “Clean transportation is good for everyone and should not become a luxury.”

David Michery, with his strong background of success, is uniquely poised to champion the cause of clean transportation. After working in the music industry for 27 years and producing more than a dozen gold or platinum records, Michery now channels his energies into the cause of clean transportation.

As the affordability of electric vehicles increases, clean transportation can become a reality.