Category Archives: Communications

A Fascinating Move in the Aerospace Industry

In a fascinating move, the aerospace industry have been looking to 3D printing technology, also known as additive manufacturing. What has typically required welding together 20 parts, for instance, can now require the use of printing just one. Many industry giants like Lockheed Martin and Honeywell are using additively manufactured components into their designs. GE Aviation has recently invested $70 million in their Auburn, Alabama factory to make 3D printed fuel nozzles for their LEAP jet engine.

As Greg Morris, who is leading the additive manufacturing team for GE Aviation in Cincinnati Ohio explained to Business Insider about their situation, “We get five times the durability. We have a lighter-weight fuel nozzle. And we frankly have a fuel nozzle that operates in an environment more effectively and more efficiently than previous fuel nozzles.”

As a leading expert in the aerospace industry, Elio Moti Sonnenfeld, explained, “These technologies are transforming what we have always known was possible and making the impossible seem possible.”

In another example, Belgian aerospace company Sonaca has accounted that they are creating a partnership with France based Fives-Michelin Additive Solutions (FMAS) to both develop and produce 3D printing titanium parts that would be used for the aerospace industry.

For this specific situation, the goal for Sonaca and FMAS is to combine Sonaca’s aerospace experience with the additive manufacturing skills that Fives-Michelin has. As Bernard Delvaux, the CEO of Sonaca said “We are extremely happy to work with Fives Michelin Additive Solutions. Their reputation in AM and the performance of their machines, backed up by several years of industrial practical application, is a remarkable asset.”

Experts in the aerospace industry have explained the impact of these partnerships. As Elio Moti Sonnenfeld explains, “With the ability to create certified 3D printed titanium aerospace parts, the companies hope that they can offer clients a location where they can design, manufacture, engineer and certify production parts.”

Additive manufacturing technologies have become a location of great interest for aerospace companies. Elio Moti Sonnenfeld explains that 3D printing can offer aerospace companies a way to produce end-use parts that is both cost effective and time efficient.

In total, additive manufacturing now represents a $3 billion slice of overall manufacturing output. Greg Morris is predicting that the number will soar as high as $100 billion in the coming years.

 

 

T-Mobile’s Legere Makes Predictions for Coming Year

T-Mobile’s John Legere at the T-Mobile Press Conference, CES 2014, Las Vegas. Photo courtesy of fanaticTRX.

John Legere, CEO of T-Mobile, related in a blog post how he sees the future of his company as well as some other issues. Stating that “by far the fastest area of growth for us,” is T-Mobile’s increase in business customers. He predicted that the number of businesses switching to T-Mobile will grow even faster than the current doubling of small to mid-size businesses already being served by T-Mobile.

Legere explained why businesses are beginning to prefer T-Mobile for their wireless services.

“American businesses are fed up with backroom deals, overages and overcharging from AT&T and Verizon,” he said. “So it should come as no surprise that businesses of all sizes are flocking—and will continue to flock—to the Un-carrier.”

Other predictions were mostly bragging about T-Mobile’s consumer base and its growth. He also touched on improvements in his company’s LTE coverage. He also stated that T-Mobile will “walk away a winner” in the lowband spectrum auctions coming to the Federal Communications Commission in 2016.

Legere also predicted/threatened that he plans on getting into Twitter battles with presidential candidates. This was a reference to a November incident in which Legere jousted with Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump after Trump tweeted that he uses T-Mobile and “it’s pathetic, dropped calls, no service.”

Nancy Glass: The Business of TV Productions

Nancy Glass of Nancy Glass Productions, has taken quite a lead in cable TV programming  in Philadelphia. Her company’s profile speaks for itself: Nancy Glass has produced: Dangerous Grounds, Tanked, R.V. 2015, We Move Animals, Footsteps in the Snow, to name but a few. Having brought in Argle Bargle Films and Rearrange Media earlier this year, Nancy Glass Productions has been able to “diversify content and leverage facilities.” With this arrangement, Nancy Glass Productions takes a 50% profit, and Argle Bargle Films/Rearrange Media, the other 50%.

Running a TV business in Philadelphia – over New York or LA – Glass has found comes with pluses and minuses. In terms of benefits, overheads are definitely cheaper but then being away from central TV locations means that travel is involved as Glass seeks to sell her “sizzle reels.”

Still, overall, given the way the world is moving increasingly into web-based operations, being a little further out shouldn’t be too much of an inhibition for companies such as Nancy Glass Productions.  As Glass herself pointed out: “We go to everybody. We talk to online platforms; we talk with cable; we talk with broadcast networks…You take a risk on things you like. That’s what you do. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn’t.”

So far, though, things seem to be working out pretty well for Nancy Glass Productions.

New Department at Nancy Glass Productions

A new department has opened at Nancy Glass Productions. The Advertising and Commercial Division was launched a couple of weeks ago “in response to an expanding commercial client mix.” It will offer a wide array of services, spanning both digital content and traditional advertisements. This includes: digital short-form videos, social media content, long-form episodic formats, etc.

Ben Fetterman – who until now has been Director of Business Development at Nancy Glass Productions – will head the new department. He explained that the team will be trying to “…identify the best solutions to take a concept from script to screen, no matter how large or small the display.”

Philadelphia-based Nancy Glass Productions was established by Nancy Glass in 2000, specializing in unscripted TV and media content. Since that time it has created 2,000+ hours of prime time reality programming. Collaborating with their partners, one of the goals of the company is to “bring their creative ideas to life.” The firm uses standard and HD and has full post production facilities and a special effects studio. Some of the clients that the firm has worked with over the last decade-and-a-half include: HGTV, DIY, A&E, Veria, Animal Planet, Travel Channel, Food Network.

 

Madoff: How You Could Have Known

Before the Madoff story broke, a research and portfolio advisory firm called Aksia issued a statement warning clients to avoid doing business with his investment fund, citing several red flags which it uncovered during an investigation. A review of these indicators offers insight into due diligence as well as warning signs to look out for prior to doing business with a firm. Aksia picked up on the following patterns and inconsistencies, and the fund’s concerns were quickly validated:

  1. The firm utilized an especially volatile investment strategy, but was still able to garner stable returns of 8-10% over an entire decade.
  2. A financial advisor who claimed to have studied the firm’s operations issued a letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2005 stating that Madoff was running a Ponzi scheme.
  3. The firm was run by family members, and the strategy was erratic and undocumented.
  4. The firm’s comptroller wasn’t based in the United States, but in Bermuda. The “feeder funds” were audited by reliable auditors, while the primary investments were not.
  5. Accounting statements were sent via mail, as opposed to email, as is commonly practiced in the industry.
  6. The firm had been looked into previously.